27 Oct
10:48

Saint George Greek Orthodox Church
Sunday October 28, 2018 Bulletin

7th Sunday of Luke
The Reading is from Luke 8:41-56

At that time, there came to Jesus a man named Jairus, who was a ruler of the synagogue; and falling at Jesus’ feet he besought him to come to his house, for he had an only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she was dying. As he went, the people pressed round him. And a woman who had had a flow of blood for twelve years and had spent all her living upon physicians and could not be healed by anyone, came up behind him, and touched the fringe of his garment; and immediately her flow of blood ceased. And Jesus said, “Who was it that touched me?” When all denied it, Peter and those who were with him said, “Master, the multitudes surround you and press upon you!” But Jesus said, “Some one touched me; for I perceive that power has gone forth from me.” And when the woman saw that she was not hidden, she came trembling, and falling down before him declared in the presence of all the people why she had touched him, and how she had been immediately healed. And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace.” While he was still speaking, a man from the ruler’s house came and said, “Your daughter is dead; do not trouble the Teacher any more.” But Jesus on hearing this answered him, “Do not fear; only believe, and she shall be well.” And when he came to the house, he permitted no one to enter with him, except Peter and John and James, and the father and mother of the child. And all were weeping and bewailing her; but he said, “Do not weep; for she is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him, knowing that she was dead. But taking her by the hand he called, saying, “Child, arise.” And her spirit returned, and she got up at once; and he directed that something should be given her to eat. And her parents were amazed; but he charged them to tell no one what had happened.

ARCHIEPISCOPAL ENCYCLICAL
Protocol Number 167/18
October 28, 2018
Feast of the Holy Protection of the Theotokos
OXI Day
To the Most Reverend Hierarchs, the Reverend Priests and Deacons, the Monks and Nuns, the Presidents and Members of the Parish Councils of the Greek Orthodox Communities, the Distinguished Archons of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, the Day, Afternoon, and Church Schools, the Philoptochos Sisterhoods, the Youth, the Hellenic Organizations, and the entire Greek Orthodox Family in America
Beloved Brothers and Sisters in Christ,
Our commemoration of OXI Day each year leads us to reflect on a very challenging time in our world and for the people of Greece. As war was spreading throughout Europe, the Axis forces demanded the surrender of Greece on October 28, 1940. Bravely and honorably, the Greek people replied, “NO.” Today, we honor the bravery and sacrifice of our fathers and mothers who stood valiantly against the armies of the fascist powers. They proclaimed a resolute “NO” to occupation. The people of Greece affirmed their love of liberty and their right of self-determination. They saw the evil and unchecked power of fascist regimes, and in their response they committed their lives to protecting their country. In faith they knew that no matter the outcome they were willing to stand courageously in the face of this threat knowing that ultimately nothing could separate them from the nobility of their heritage and the love of God.
Today, we are inspired by our forbearers as we celebrate their courage and honor their memory. They said “NO” to those who advanced power and control at any cost. They stood firm against an ideology and its forces that would only separate them from their freedom, their rights, and their way of life. We find courage in their example and hope and strength in the promise that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:38-39).
The experience of God’s love and the promise that His love is always with us helped the people of Greece in hope and faith to endure all things (I Corinthians 13:7). They knew that the power of God’s love was greater than the power of fascist regimes. They knew that the love of God was essential to their freedom, and to their love for their families and communities, and for their country.
With the assurance and truth of God’s love, we are able to stand firm against any evil use of power or false ideology. As the people of Greece in 1940 and as many witnesses of our faith have done, we can boldly proclaim “NO” in the face of those who seek to destroy life and liberty, those who use power to abuse and manipulate others, and those who try to separate us from our faith and the love of God.
As we commemorate the valiant people of Greece on OXI Day, and we laud their courage before the world, may we give thanks to God for the witness offered to us and to generations to come. May we also pray for the eternal memory and blessed repose of those who stood heroically for their faith and their nation. May we be inspired to stand firmly in the love of God, knowing that nothing can separate us from the great and saving love we have in Him through Christ Jesus.
With paternal love in Him,
† D E M E T R I O S
Archbishop of America

Holy Protection of the Mother of God

The Holy Protection of the Mother of God

The Protection of the Mother of God is one of the most beloved feast days on the Orthodox calendar among the Slavic peoples, commemorated on October 1. The feast is celebrated additionally on October 28 in the Greek tradition. It is also known as the feast of the Virgin Mary’s Cerement.

The Feast
The feast day celebrates the appearance of the Mother of God at Blachernae (Vlaherna) in the tenth century. At the end of St. Andrei (Andrew of Constantinople) Yurodivyi’s life, he, with his disciple St. Epiphanius, and a group of people, saw the Mother of God, St. John the Baptist, and several other saints and angels during a vigil in the Church of Blachernae, nearby the city gates. The Blachernae Palace church was where several of her relics were kept. The relics were her robe, veil, and part of her belt that had been transferred from Palestine during the fifth century.
The Theotokos approached the center of the church, knelt down and remained in prayer for a long time. Her face was drowned in tears. Then she took her veil (cerement) off and spread it over the people as a sign of protection. During the time, the people in the city were threatened by a barbarian invasion. After the appearance of the Mother of God, the danger was averted and the city was spared from bloodshed and suffering.

About the icon
Two different events that took place four hundred years apart are combined in this one icon. Both events took place in the former Church of Blachernae in Constantinople. The icon of the feast, Protection of the Mother of God, shows the Theotokos standing above the faithful with her arms outstretched in prayer and draped with a veil. On both sides of her are angels. On the lower right of most icons of this feast, are saints Andrew and his disciple Epiphanius who saw this vision of the Mother of God, with the twelve apostles, bishops, holy women, monks and martyrs, spreading her veil in protection over the congregation. St. Epiphanius is wearing a tunic under his cloak and gestures in astonishment at the miraculous appearance, while St. Andrew, Fool-for-Christ, is dressed only in a cloak.

Below the Theotokos, in the center of the icon, stands a young man with a halo, he is clothed in a deacon’s sticharion. In his left hand, he is holding an open scroll with the text of the Kontakion for Nativity in honor of the Mother of God. This is St. Romanus the Melodist, the famous hymnographer whose feast is also celebrated on the same day, October 1. He is with his choir attended by the Emperor Leo the Wise together with the Empress and the Patriarch of Constantinople.

Today’s Events, Tomorrow’s Announcements
Michael Heath and Maria Chiotis will be baptized this afternoon. May God grant them many years.
Greek Dancing!
Come on Tuesday evenings at 6:30 PM to learn the steps of the Greek dances you’ve always wanted to learn! Roula Leristis will hold classes in the Hellenic Hall

Save the Dates:
November 4: General Assembly
The General Assembly will begin immediately following Divine Liturgy. Issues, concerns and motions made will be brought up for discussion and may require a vote. Only current stewards may participate in voting. Additionally, nominations for election to the parish council will also take place. In order to be nominated for election to the parish council, a member must be in good standing, active in the liturgical life of the church and have been a steward of St. George for at least one year.

Everyone is encouraged to attend the General Assembly and participate by offering your suggestions and opinions on how we can work together in a spirit of cooperation with God in order to strengthen and build the body of Christ (our Church) for ourselves and our children. If you would like to become a steward please see our Parish Council Treasurer, Mr. Dimitri Leristis.

AGENDA:
Opening Prayer – Father Constantine
Election of Moderator – Louis Kolivas
Secretary’s Report – Kathy Nikiforakis
Treasurer’s Report – Dimitri Leristis
Stewardship Report – Andrea Polizos
Activities Report – Louis Kolivas
Facility Report – Peter Bradshaw
Other Business

December 1: St. George Christmas Bazaar
The Christmas Bazaar Committee members are requesting for:
a. Christmas-related item for the Yiayia Christmas Attic Treasures donations
b. Cash donations for the purchase of baking items
c. Volunteers: bakers

Today’s Coffee Hour Fellowship
Sponsored by: The Bradshaw Family
After Divine Liturgy, parishioners gather around the social hall for fellowship with members of the parish over coffee and some delicious food and pastries. If you would like to sponsor coffee hour by yourself or with a friend or family member, please write your name on the sheet that is mounted on the wall outside the kitchen door.

Attending to the Needs of Others:
If you or anyone you know is sick, please see or contact Fr. Constantine directly
cell phone: 978-314-4992 or email: constcamb@verizon.net.
Sacraments and Other Services:
(Baptism, Chrismation, Confession, Communion, Holy Matrimony, and Holy Unction, 40-day Churching of the Mother and Child, Memorial Service or House Blessings) Please see or contact Fr. Constantine.

Internet Ministry:
Facebook: St. George Greek Orthodox Church- Keene, NH https://www.facebook.com/events/708181219561795/
St. George Greek Orthodox Church Website: http://stgeorgekeene.org/

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